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  #1  
Old 12-22-2003, 04:47 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2002
etodolac vs rimadyl vs all other pain meds

pogo has bad bone/joint and muscle pain, he has been on etodolac since he was 6 months old and now he is 5 years old. He is under the care of my mother who is a medical doctor and wonders why she has to pay so much money for prescription etodolac when he could take an over the counter pain med. I told her that I thought that baby aspirin in small amounts to tide him over between prescriptions was fine but I couldnt answer her question why other pain medicines couldnt be used. My main question is, what is the difference between etodolac and most over the counter pain meds, and besides liver problems and stomach problems (which etodolac will give him anyway) what could be the problem with other meds?
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  #2  
Old 12-22-2003, 06:49 PM
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Re: etodolac vs rimadyl vs all other pain meds

Quote:
Originally posted by Pogo
pogo has bad bone/joint and muscle pain, he has been on etodolac since he was 6 months old and now he is 5 years old. He is under the care of my mother who is a medical doctor and wonders why she has to pay so much money for prescription etodolac when he could take an over the counter pain med. I told her that I thought that baby aspirin in small amounts to tide him over between prescriptions was fine but I couldnt answer her question why other pain medicines couldnt be used. My main question is, what is the difference between etodolac and most over the counter pain meds, and besides liver problems and stomach problems (which etodolac will give him anyway) what could be the problem with other meds?
Its funny you bring this up because our older rescue bitch is experiencing pain in the back legs now. My Vet felt that alot of the statements about rimadyl are unwarranted. His reasoning is it only effects dogs with health problems and if the dog started showing signs of jaundice then just change the medicine. He indicated there were 6 tiers of pain medicine. First you use the aspirin then the etogesic(very similiar to aspirin), then as the pain gets worse move on to rimadyl and then deramaxn. Stage 5 is metacan and finally when the pain is really at its worse use Zubran. I apologize if the spelling is wrong on the medicine's but I have a hard time reading the Doctors writing. But if I understand what he told me try the aspirin first then on to the stronger meds. If you dog cannot tolerate them then change the meds.;)
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  #3  
Old 12-22-2003, 09:54 PM
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Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Tucson, AZ
We carry Zubrin at my clinic, since with its safety record, it is a medicine I will dispense without screening bloodwork. I have not noticed it to be any more effective than Rimadyl. The metacam seems most effective in severe cases to me. Why are the prices high? Because the drug companies keep them that way. Be prepared, Pfizer just hit us with a big increase in Rimadyl prices for the new year.
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  #4  
Old 12-22-2003, 10:29 PM
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Location: clt-nc-usa
Interesting to read that nsaids should be okay for dogs "with no other health problems." Is being very old considered a health problem? My old dog had perfect bloodwork, till we tried him on aspirin (kidney trouble), and then rimadyl(liver trouble). We see no reason to try Derramax since we know it will mess up his kidneys.

Where is Zubrin metabolized?
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  #5  
Old 12-22-2003, 10:49 PM
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It is not unusual for an elderly animal to lose some function. While some dogs have a bad time processing some of the meds, many dogs have also had their life and quality of life extended due to them.

I had a friend with a 11 YO Rottweiler who got so crippled up they were going to put him down. The vet suggested they try the rimadyl which they did. He had another year of relative comfort. He did develop liver problems most likely from the Rimady and I heard the guy cursing the meds. All I could think of was what a jerk! He was going to put the dog down for Pete's sake and was angry because of the eventual side effects which in truth bought the dog an addition year of quality life.

So, evaluate the purpose of the meds and the possible trade offs and/or monitor carefully. But I would not want something that can offer comfort care to be denied a dog out of hand because of possible side effects.
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  #6  
Old 12-22-2003, 11:30 PM
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Location: Tucson, AZ
Zubrin is changed into an active metabolite within the blood I believe.(need to dig out that brochure the rep left). It is considered to be very low risk(rep claims zero, but they won't put that in writing) to kidneys and liver. It does, however have the same risk for GI upset and ulceration that other NSAIDS have. Any signs of GI upset are an indication to stop treatment immediately. I still prefer to check bloodwork on all NSAID patients, but I have some clients who simply cannot afford it, so will use Zubrin in those cases.
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  #7  
Old 12-22-2003, 11:38 PM
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Sorry guys I dont think i was clear enough, I was wondering what would be wrong with advil, aleve, tylonol etc, it is so much cheaper. We give him etodolac but it cost 150 for the last bottle. sorry for the confusion
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  #8  
Old 12-23-2003, 06:23 AM
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Tylenol is BIG no-no for dogs. You can give regular aspirin, aspirin seemed just as effective as Rimadyl/Etogesic for my very old dog. And make sure he is not carrying any extra weight at all, that will also help a great deal.

In addition to whatever more learned members than I suggest, consider adding glucosamine/chrondritin to his diet. It certainly won't hurt, and may very well help, you can use the people kind. I saw a marked improvement in my dog with elbow dysplasia with this; I changed nothing else and his chronic limp disappeared.
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  #9  
Old 12-23-2003, 08:48 AM
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If you choose to try aspirin, Ascriptin is a good name brand. It's buffered, and recommended by a lot of vets.

We've used it successfully for two dogs, unsuccessfully for one, starting about 10 years ago. Since then, it's become my husband's favorite for himself.
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  #10  
Old 12-23-2003, 09:54 AM
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I use baby aspirin for my very old 33lb mixed breed. I was given Rimadyl for Chivas when she had osteo and didnt think it worked so I was then prescribed piroxicam and it worked VERY well. But (stop me if im wrong) i BELIEIVE you have to wait up to 2 weeks when switching from aspirin to Rimadyl, cant remember why now, but that sticks in my head for some reason.
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  #11  
Old 12-23-2003, 11:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Pogo
Sorry guys I dont think i was clear enough, I was wondering what would be wrong with advil, aleve, tylonol etc, it is so much cheaper. We give him etodolac but it cost 150 for the last bottle. sorry for the confusion
Well for one thing all of the over the counter meds you mention will potentially kill your dog. The only OTC pain reliever you can safely give your dog is asprin. Most coated or buffered asprin won't disolve quickly enough to give much relief. Uncoated asprin can cause stomach problems. Ascriptin is combined with Malox and that is the best choice IMO. It disolves in the stomach and with the malox, it won't cause the stomach problems.
I have given my older girl Ascriptin for her moderate elbow dysplaisa with good results. I have given her upto 1500 mg a day for her worst days, but generally 325 to 500 mg a day works well for her.
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  #12  
Old 12-23-2003, 12:09 PM
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It hasn't been specifically said so I'm just going to add that Advil (Ibuprofen) is VERY bad for dogs. Mr. Yuck all over the place.
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