Rottweiler Discussion Forums

Go Back   Rottweiler Discussion Forums > Rottweiler > Vets Corner
Did you forget your password? Reset it here


Vets Corner This area is designated to the health and welfare of our pets.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-11-2003, 02:56 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island,NY
Hip Dysplasia

Hi everyone, My 9 month old Rottie has been diagnosed with hip dysplasia, the left back leg is graded as a 1 and the right one is a 4.My vet has recommended surgery, it is called Femoral head resection.Has anyone ever heard of this?I have Diesel on Gylcoflex, Nupro and extrs Glucosamine and chondritin.I am switching him at the moment fom solid gold to canidae.I hope i am doing the right things,if anyone has any ideas or input about this surgery it would be great. Thanks
Reply With Quote
 
  #2  
Old 11-11-2003, 05:46 PM
Patty1231's Avatar
Valued Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Tyrone, PA/USA
DieselsMom, I'll be interested, too, to see what information you receive on this. I don't have a problem with my dog but the breeder I got him from told me that only in severe cases can HD be diagnosed prior to 12 months of age with the proper x-rays. She also said that rotties go through a "bone remodeling" stage at 7-10 months and many vets will misinterpret this as HD. I'd like to know what the more experienced in this forum think of this, as well.
Reply With Quote


  #3  
Old 11-11-2003, 06:04 PM
Sharon Marples's Avatar
Valued Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Hayden Lake, ID, USA
Images: 28
Is your vet an ortho specialist? If not, I would definitely want to consult with one first to get a second opinion before jumping into surgery.

You might also want to try Adequan instead of / along with the other supplements. You can do a search of the forums and find lots of information on it.

Good luck, let us know what you decide to do.
__________________
Sharon Marples ~ Von Marc Rottweilers
North Idaho
Reply With Quote


  #4  
Old 11-11-2003, 06:42 PM
Valued Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Snyder, NY (via Toronto)
Quote:
Femoral head resection
When I was a tech I saw this procedure done on quite a few dogs - it was generally very successful (I don't recall one surgery that didn't result in much better quality of life for the dog). Ideally, you want to do it on a dog that's still fit, and not a dog that's got no muscle tone from being unable to exercise because of pain. I agree with Sharon about getting a second opinion from an ortho specialist, but if you do decide on surgery, I'd do it sooner rather than later.
__________________
Amanda
----------
"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." - Groucho Marx
Reply With Quote


  #5  
Old 11-11-2003, 08:19 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island,NY
Sharon, It is kind of a long story but i will sum it up,last month i brought Diesel to the vet, his front paws were shaky, they did xrays and sent me to an orthopedic surgeon that said it was hod and elbow dysplasia in the front paws and wanted to do shoulder xrays suspecting OCD.We did not trust the vet and so we changed over to a vet that a Rottweiller breeder where i live recommended, so we made the appointment and today we found after the xrays of the hips that he has hip dysplasia,what is considered severe hip dysplasia?He has alot of pain from the back legs and was yelping as the vet was trying to manipulate the hips so we had to put him under.As it turns out, this vet says he does not see elbow dysplsia on the front paws and says he might outgrow the hd.I didnt know about not being able to diagnose until around 12 months, anyway my vet gave him a shot of Dexamasone and told me to watch his behavior for 2 weeks and by then we (my husband and I)should have been able to come to a decision, I have no problem doing the surgery if it is the right thing to do. and i gotta add with my experience with vets lately I HAVE HAD IT!!!!!Thanks for listening
Reply With Quote


  #6  
Old 11-11-2003, 09:04 PM
Valued Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: USA
It is not true that you cannot diagnose HD until 12 months of age. If the hips are bad, they are not going to get better. Now, good hips are not set by that age and can still deterioriate a bit, but bad hips do not go away.

Now the other thing to be aware of is if he has joint disease in his front, having the rear bad is putting most of his weight forward and causing even more difficulty there. It is possible that if he can get his rear so it is more useable, his front will be in better shape.
Reply With Quote


  #7  
Old 11-12-2003, 10:52 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island,NY
Hi Judi, have you ever heard of the surgery that my vet recommended?What is your opinion of this? I was doing some research last night and on one website it says that this surgery should only be used as second choice, What do you think?There seems to be 3 different ways to go,sorry for so many questions i just want to make a clear headed decision.
Reply With Quote


  #8  
Old 11-12-2003, 11:10 AM
Valued Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: USA
I can't help you with surgery choices because fortunately I've never faced those choices. I understand that there is an ortho site in the Yahoo groups and I would suspect that you would get some decent information there. I do have an article at home that outlines and details the different surgeries available for HD. I probably won't have time to pull it and reread until next week, but I will do that. As I recall it was quite detailed and objective.
Reply With Quote


  #9  
Old 11-12-2003, 06:49 PM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Glendale, AZ USA
Images: 3
It's been YEARS since I worked for a vet...but back when I did, the femoral head operation was an option for smaller dogs - I saw an extremely successful one done on a sheltie. When I was considering surgery on Maverick, I was given the option of a TPO (when he was VERY young) or a total hip replacement. Perhaps they've changed methods now and you have more options though. I'd call around some other vets and specialists - maybe even a vet school and see what they all say. Best of luck in whatever you choose to do.
__________________
Shawna and...

U-CD, FO, GRCH, CH Ciel Legend Vom Stefanhaus, CDX, AJP, AXP, RAE, PT, JHD, CS, CI, CX, BH, RL1, TT, CGC, , THD, TDIAV (born 2-15-03)
and many other furry *kids*
Reply With Quote


  #10  
Old 11-12-2003, 07:03 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: PA
Just as a note, I had an overzealous and somewhat inexperienced vet tell me my eight week old puppy had hips that were of "questionable integrity". A second opinion proved otherwise, and in your case, I may even seek a third.

I see you're in Long Island. How far are you from Cornell University in New York? Depending on what your future plans are for your boy, I may even try and get a consult there. I've taken a number of horses and one dog there with excellent results.

Best of luck to you and yours.
__________________
Jayne May
Reply With Quote


  #11  
Old 11-13-2003, 12:37 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Grovetown, GA
Images: 5
I have heard of an FHO b/c one of my dogs had to have one due to being hit by a car, not HD. She was 11 months at the time of the accident. The accident shattered her hip socket so there was no chance of a hip replacement (which is what I would have preferred). In an FHO they remove the head of the femur so that the "joint" works the way the shoulder does - all with muscle. It was a long, slow recovery process, but my girl is 95% now (it has been 10 months since the accident). My husband and I did LOTS AND LOTS of physical therapy with her. When the accident happended we took her to the best ortho around which was at the university a couple hours from our house. If Cornell is within a days drive I would go there. Teaching hospitals are on the cutting edge of medicine.

Do some research on FHO and total hip replacements. Just so you know if your guy does really require a total hip replacement they still cut of the head of the femur in order to put in an artifical ball and socket. I wouldn't be worried about either procedure as long as your guy is in the right hands and you are deligent about the physical therapy. Let me know if you want to know about the PT. It is about the same for both procedures, but a little more teadious with the FHO.

Good Luck!! And give Diesel a big houg and kiss from me!!!
STaci
__________________
Staci

Bella von der Barenau, BH, RN, Ztp (AIRK)
^Heaton's Zephir Whispers^, OB III, BH, CD, RN, HIC, CGC
SERYS'05 ^Othello vom Wilden Westen^, SchH II, BH, BST
^Neiko^, CGC
Reply With Quote


  #12  
Old 11-14-2003, 07:16 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island,NY
Thanks everyone for all the info .Staci it would be great if you could tell me about the recovery and the physical therapy that you did, i was not even aware that the recovery would be that involved, Ya definately learn something new everyday!Anyway any pointers would be great to hear, and thanks for responding
Reply With Quote


  #13  
Old 11-15-2003, 01:36 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Grovetown, GA
Images: 5
This is what we had to do with my girl since she had an FHO. Like I said before an FHO creates a false joint like a shoulder since they remove the head of the femur. The key to recovery from FHO surgery is maintaining range of motion by NOT allowing scar tissue to set-up in the wrong place. You do this by building up the hip and leg muscles as much as possible. Granted her muscle was jello after the surgery becase of the incision that was made. Anyway, while she was still in the hospital she was being walked every 2-4 hours for about 5 minutes to start out. While the students walked her they taught her the command "foot". "Foot" meant for her to use her injured leg and to place her "foot" on the ground. They would praise her greatly for this. She learned the command right away. After her walks she would receive ice packs, a massage and doggie ice cream! She was in the hospital in ICU for about 1 week then she came home.

Once at home she had to remain very quiet. Her potty time was different from her therapy time. She was to be walked every 2-4 hours beginning with 5 minutes and increasing every time by 1-2 minutes if she was doing well. We still were reenforcing the command "foot". Therapy time was suppose to be quiet and away from where she took potty breaks. She was NOT allowed to climb stairs, NO playing with th other dogs, and COMPLETE leash control. My husband was able to take her to work with him for the 1st 6 weeks which helped out tremendously. Recovery time from surgery is about 6 weeks, but recovery and therapy time for her muscle to build back up was much, much greater (4-6 months). We kept her from playing with our other dogs for about 4 months, and controlled stair climbing after 5 months. Once the weather was warm enough I began to swim her almost every day. Swimming cuts therapy sessions in half.

Now, after 10 months I just walk her every day for 2-4 miles. We really don't do "therapy" any more. We walk together to keep her muscles fit and to keep her range of motion in tact.

Our Ortho said that must people do not do the required amount of PT after FHO's or hip replacements. And it shows in their dogs, but most people have pets and it really doesn't matter to them how they walk as long as they can and they are not in pain. Just being able to walk for my girl was not good enough for us. I wanted to be able to compete with her in obedience, schutzhund, etc. She is fit enough to do these things b/c my husband and I put forth the effort and dedication in her PT for her to turn out the way she is now which is about 95% of what she was before surgery. I think that is pretty damn good!!! You would never know anything was wrong with her if I didn't tell you.

I hope this helps!
STaci
__________________
Staci

Bella von der Barenau, BH, RN, Ztp (AIRK)
^Heaton's Zephir Whispers^, OB III, BH, CD, RN, HIC, CGC
SERYS'05 ^Othello vom Wilden Westen^, SchH II, BH, BST
^Neiko^, CGC
Reply With Quote


  #14  
Old 11-15-2003, 01:46 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island,NY
Wow!!!!

I am glad you wrote back,I had no idea what was in store for Diesel. I guess my vet will tell me when i decide on the surgery but at the consult he made it sound like this was the easiest surgery to recover from.I appreciate your help, i think i am going to print this thread so i can follow it.I have 3 kids and a lab so this is definately going to be a challenge!!!!!!!Thank you again for your help.
Reply With Quote


  #15  
Old 11-15-2003, 01:56 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Grovetown, GA
Images: 5
One more thing

Just a reminder that my girl was hit by a car so her hip was not her only injury. A piece of her tail bone was broken and screwed back on (if this would have been our only injury this would have been great). She also had multiple fractures to her pelvis. There was nothing they could do about these other than keep her quiet for a long time. But still, FHO's require a lot of PT. Hip replacements are a little easier.

Staci
__________________
Staci

Bella von der Barenau, BH, RN, Ztp (AIRK)
^Heaton's Zephir Whispers^, OB III, BH, CD, RN, HIC, CGC
SERYS'05 ^Othello vom Wilden Westen^, SchH II, BH, BST
^Neiko^, CGC
Reply With Quote


Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:54 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.

The thoughts expressed in the interviews and/or commentary contained within these forums are solely those of the individual(s) providing them and do not represent and/or reflect the opinions of Rottweiler Dot Net, it's parent site or it's affiliates.

Copyright © 1998 - 2014 Rottweiler Discussion Forums-All Rights Reserved - No part of this site may be reproduced without permission.