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Nutrition and Grooming Cleaning teeth, clipping nails got you stumped? Should you feed natural or commercial? Here's the place to post your comments and get your answers.

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  #1  
Old 03-28-2000, 05:48 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2000
How to build muscle mass.

Is there any type of food or vitamin to boost a rottie's mass.I feed my girl Iams large breed form.But I would like her to be a little larger.

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HELLO(B)CAD
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  #2  
Old 03-28-2000, 06:03 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2000
There are many products on the market that claim to make mass. I would stay away from most of the supplements. The only supplement that I have found to be good is Nupro. If you dog is under 2yrs I would not worry about mass, it will come in time. The more mass that a dog carries the more stress that is on its joints. If you start training for definition early, the mass that the dog gets at adulthood is spectacular.
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  #3  
Old 03-28-2000, 07:34 PM
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Join Date: Dec 1998
You can only enhance the dog's genetic potential unless, of course, you use anabolic steroids like some human body builders. For many reasons this is very undesirable. Keeping a young dog fit and well conditioned with proper nutrition and exercise will make the most of its future genetic potential. No supplement in the world (unless illegal) can produce muscle mass where there is no genetic potential for it. And, as mentioned above, over exercising and over feeding a young dog can only put added stress and strain on joints that aren't fully mature yet.

Nancy
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  #4  
Old 03-28-2000, 10:19 PM
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Join Date: Dec 1999
I'll have to agree with Dave and Nancy for the most part. I have heard first hand that for a mature working dog this supplement has it's advantages. http://www.k9power.simplenet.com/peak.htm
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  #5  
Old 03-29-2000, 12:26 AM
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Join Date: Nov 1998
I agree with Nancy and Dave. The supplement recommended by Fergie, called Peak Condition 2, in my personal opinion is highly priced and way overrated; although it might be useful for working-performance dogs. Other than that, you will be wasting money trying to beat genetics by over supplementing the dog to make it larger. Definitely not advisable.
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  #6  
Old 03-29-2000, 01:25 AM
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Join Date: Dec 1999
First of all, let me say I never had the desire to build up my dogs' muscle mass, and I agree that trying to do it would be expensive and not worth the end result. Face it, if you're born to look like Woody Allen all the steroids in the world won't get you to look like Lou Ferigno. If your dog doesn't have the genetics for big muscle, she can only improve a marginal amount.
However, I've done a little body-building myself and made some pretty good gains (went from bench pressing 115-lbs in college to 275-lbs at the age of 31) without steroids (but I still look normal). In my opinion, you cannot gain muscle mass naturally with supplements alone; you have to train hard also. Creatine is the best body-building supplement I've tried, and I've seen it in some of the dog supplements they advertise to build muscle (Foster & Smith is one of those companies). However, I believe you have to train hard to realize its benefits. That can make it difficult for bulking up your dog because you can't give him/her a set of weights! The closest thing I see to doggie body-building is carting. Maybe getting your dog involved in carting or sled pulling along with giving her creatine supplements could accomplish that.
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  #7  
Old 03-29-2000, 10:36 AM
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Join Date: Nov 1998
Ramon,
I lift weights myself (43 and still pumping iron). The ONLY dog sport activity that resemblance bodybuilding is carting, and that's it. I don't agree that you have to supplement dogs with creatine (naturally found in red meat), free-form amino acids (found in meat proteins), complex carbohydrates (found on whole wheat, whole grain rice, etc), to make a dog a better CANINE athlete. I have two well-built solid performance Rotties, and all they eat is dog food diet... none of that Peak Performance and similar supplementation, and they both look beautiful and work hard for a living
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  #8  
Old 03-29-2000, 08:37 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2000
I must agree with Ramone that creatine is a supplement that really works. Although, the Foster and Smith stuff is to small a doseage to work very well and is VERY over priced. Human grade creatine is far cheeper and held to higher standards than vet grade.Creatine is found in red meat but in to small an amount to make a very large gain in muscle mass and strength. The amount needed to see gains is about 2.5 grams per 100lb per day. Red meat has about .3 grams per pound.Remember creatine not only adds mass but also increases strenth and endurance.

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Christopher Smith
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  #9  
Old 03-29-2000, 08:42 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Cad, if you really want to keep her in shape, give her lots of good healthy exercise (without overdoing it either) every day. Combined with a healthy diet, she will bloom slowly and become a source of pride to you. These dogs end up with so many physical problems because people just don't understand that their bones and bodies need to grow slowly.
Barbara
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  #10  
Old 03-29-2000, 09:03 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2000
You can overdose any vitamin. I would stay away from these supplements. My male is 110 pds,26.3 inches solid as a rock and can jump a 5 ft fence standing from still. I just feed quality dog food and let the dog exercise to his preference. Weight pulls is by far the best exercise. If you need to add definition use a harness with a heavy chain attached and run for short distances, then walk, then run, get the picture? This will increase strength without overly stressing the dogs system.
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  #11  
Old 03-29-2000, 09:21 PM
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Join Date: Mar 1999
The best thing you can do is feed your dog a quality diet containing the proper protein needed for muscle developement. Unlike humans, dogs cannot digest complex carbohydrates. The following is from a newsletter by Lew Olson who has been involved in Rotties for over 25 years and has a degree in nutrition.

"Dogs, as carnivores, have difficulty digesting grains and other complex carbohydrates. With the lack of digestive enzymes in the mouth, complex carbohydrates are not predigested, and take a long time to break down in the stomach, and small intestine, if they break down at all. Most of the complex carbohydrates pass through undigested, and create large stools in the dog.

It is interesting to note that dry dog foods are mainly cereal, consisting of a large part of corn, wheat, rice and soy. While dog food companies would have you believe that grains are a good source of protein, the fact is that dogs have a very difficult time digesting and utilizing protein from carbohydrates. Studies show dogs do best on animal protein, and the higher the quality, the better the protein is assimilated. The poorer quality proteins create a stress on the dogs kidneys and it makes proper nutritional digestion difficult."
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  #12  
Old 03-29-2000, 09:27 PM
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Join Date: Nov 1998
Barbara is absolutely right

Giving creatine to dogs, expecting them to become powerful bodybuilders, is only an expensive waste of money, UNLESS they are pulling weights like in carting, other than that they is no need for it. My dogs don't take creatine as a supplement, only in raw meat, and they work and compete in advanced obedience, agility, and protection & guard work, excelling at it... while I save a bundle of money
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  #13  
Old 03-29-2000, 09:33 PM
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Join Date: Nov 1998
PowerRotts is also quite right. Adding "Prozyme" (a natural digestive enzymes product) will greatly improve the digestion of proteins, fats, and carbs, thus making the absorption of those nutrients more efficient in favor of an overall good health and better working performance.
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  #14  
Old 03-30-2000, 01:28 AM
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Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Clarksville, AR USA
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Cad,
Just read in another topic that your dog is 1 year old and 87lbs. Rottweilers don't mature physically until 2 or 3 years of age. They normally don't fill out until then. 87lbs is plenty of dog for one year old. Don't do anything to try to bulk her up. It could cause problems down the road. Also, I don't think you should try much carting until she is 18 months old or so.
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  #15  
Old 03-30-2000, 01:32 AM
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Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Corona Del Mar, CA, USA
I'm thinking that sledge-pulling (no wheels) would also build mass but you'd have to guard against strain/over doing it. Running up hills can also be used to build mass in chest and rear - the easy way to do this is play fetch up the hill - they run up and trot back for recovery.
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