Rottweiler Discussion Forums

Go Back   Rottweiler Discussion Forums > Rottweiler > Behavior
Did you forget your password? Reset it here


Behavior Behavior problems, suggestions, support. Please use this forum for all behavior related posts.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 05-18-2011, 12:17 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Melbourne Victoria Australia
Images: 12
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

I know that what most people write here is only done so out of ignorance in that they havn't been involved in the world of protection orientated dogs and the love of their dogs and believing that it has some power to jump to their aid if needed but whilst it is "possable" to have such a dog such dogs are incredably rare and in most cases by the time I am involved with such a dog it is because the dog is being overly aggressive. Even from the strongest of working bloodline dogs it is very, very rare to find a naturally protective Rottweiler that is outwardly friendly to strangers without training. If it was so easy to find such dogs then why would people bother protection training them? I can say in recent times that when testing adult dogs I have found very few dogs that could perform any real protection role without training. Below I will paste a reply to a thread I posted a fair time back now but it is still relelvant. This topic has been done time and again here and like always I will say that you can belive anything you want, just as you can believe in the Easter Bunny if you like but don't put yourselves in harms way or act in any way believing that your dog will protect you until you have had it tested as to do so is far more likely to end badly for you. In my experience training dogs for such things to find the naturally protective Rottweiler now that will truly engage in a real life situation is well into the one percentile.

Quickly I must comment on a few points. Daisy was ten weeks old when I was watching a video on my computer with a girl who was frightened and screamed. Daisy was sleeping in her crate and when she heard the scream she started barking and ran around my house growling and checking rooms all the while coming back to where i sitting and leaning against my legs looking around for a threat. I have no doubt that she did acted as you described but to believe that a 10 week old puppy has any protective ability or desire is simply niave. Her behavior shows a perception to threat which is normal and similarly distressed responce but has nothing to do with a desire to defend you. I have bred and raised many pups that have gone on to be very capable protection dogs and never have I seen a pup of 10 weeks with anything like the strength to search for a threat with a desire to take it on. Even the strongest of pups tht I have seen and tested would never desire to engage in a fight to the point of going to seek it.

Once, however, she did not like this certain guy. The guy kept trying to make friends with her and she would have nothing to do with him and kept moving away from him. Then about a month later this same guy was in prison for robbery. Ok I get to hear stories like this all the time but if you look into this further you would see that for a dog to understand that person "A" is bad and person "B" is good the dog would need to understand a society to exist and that such rules would govern how the behave. So in this case if this is true then a dog would have to understand the idea of possession and that something belongs to someone else shoud not be taken however I have not seen such a dog. Sure I have seen a dog learn that it is not to touch a certain toy or eat certain food by receiving a consequence when doing so but I have never seen a dog learn such a concept of possession as we as human dog with a society of laws, our understanding of money etc. So for him to understand that person "A" is bad because he steals things he would need to understand a complex concept and I am yet to meet a dog who has such an interlect. Every dog I have seen if he sees something it truly wants and has not been taught to leave it alone will seek to take that object without the slightest care about whos it is. Further anyone that has owned a number of dogs at the one time will tell you about the trouble they have had when giving their dogs high value items such as bones etc as the dogs are likely to fight to get them and take them from one another. Thus it is difficult for me to see a dog understanding such a conept as the one spoken about above and if indeed the dog does not understand such a concept it is difficult to see them judging a person based on this. Further to this I have worked with training dogs in the prison system as well as taking my own dog into prisons. In this role I have seen dogs meet murders, rapists etc and never once have a seen them make a judgement about someone based on this. I have seen a dog react because of how someone was acting and I have seen dogs decide they do not like a certain person for a reason I can't see but until someone shows me a dog that can walk a line up and pick out the guilty person time and again I do not think I will put much faith in their ability to read character. I hear time and again similar stories about dogs not liking someone cause they where a child molestor etc but again I cannot put any credability in such claims as I am a breeder and I know that any of my stud males would mate with their sister, their mother or their daughter if they are in season that they couldn't care less about age or even really about being invited. In a dogs world the male must dominate the bitch to mate. In our world we call things like that sexual assault and rape. A dogs judgement on what is correct behavior is a little different from our own.

I was wondering though, do not most rotties have a guarding, protective instinct? Although Roc will let just about anyone in my house, I'm sure that if it was someone that was going to do harm that he would react. It is certainly true that for a time Rotts where bred for such work but those days are long gone and the temperament type of such dogs back in those years is very different from what we seek and breed for today. We simply do not breed for such a reactive temperament anymore and as such have lost a lot of this temperament type. Further it could certainly be true that a lot of dogs would like to defend but most lack the temperament strength to actually do the job. They are to concerned with getting hurt to engage in a fight with an animal two or three times it's own size. Also back in the days when this was very much a dogs role they also had the knowledge that a trained dog was better than an untrained one and they trained for such work.

Anyway I hope this helps clear this up a bit. What follows is the post I wrote a few years back.

Mick.

As I am one of the people who state that in the vast majority of cases a dog will not defend it's owner in a real life attack situation I will answer this.

Why wouldn't they? I will start with this. Why won't a Rottweiler defend it's owner from attack when all the books etc say that it will and they are a guarding breed after all? Well there is actually a number of reasons why they will not. In short they are "they lack the courage", "we inhibit them", "we teach them humans are superior to them", "you are asking them to take on an animal 2-3 times it's physical size", "Pack hierachy works against it".

Firstly it is due to the fact that most Rottweiler breeders no longer selectivly breed for the true strength that is required for them to handle the high level stress that is required to take on an animal 2-3 times it's size (do not under estimate this point). It is wrong to argue that "they did it once so they can now" when the selection criteria that was used to make sure these dogs were capable of it is no longer being used. In most cases it takes about 3 generations for this to deminish when people breed from the wrong dogs and as few test for it it is hard to select the correct dogs. In this case they simply lack the courage for such aggressive responces. You can believe all that you want that they do posses the necessary courage but sports like SchH and PSA etc show that they do not. Most SchH will tell you straight out that there are few that can handle and extremely few who really excel at the sport. Why? Because they lack the courage. Most Rotts now get their SchH111 by being locked in prey and whilst they look the part lack the real conviction to do the job for real.

Going further down this line we also control out dogs. We teach them that we are a superior animal and that they must follow our lead etc. This is reasonable as we need to control the dog etc. However in most cases the dogs form the association that humans are bigger and stronger and that they must be obeyed and that they do pose a real threat and that they can beat the dog. The dog learns that all humans are superior to it. This is why in most cases a novice handler can hand their dog over to a trainer and have the trainer handle the dog easily. The trainer can give a correction to the dog and it shows no aggressive responce and simply alters it's behavior. In this case the trainer is directly challenging the dog. Why does it not attack? Learned responce. Further to this we inhibit their aggression from a very early age. We rightly so teach them it is incorrect to bite. It is often difficult for them to over come their leanred behavior.

Further to this due to the fact that the dog is a pack animal also goes to why so many dogs in a real life threat actually attack the OWNER. A dog veiws the owner as the pack leader. Then this new person comes along and bashes the owner. The owner goes to ground. There is a new pack leader. This is something I see often and something I will illustrate in one of my actual cases I speak about. So just remember when you are relying on your dog to protect you if you are beaten and go to ground, look out. Even when we are talking about a trained Protectrion dog if it has not be trained to look for the owner and bite the other person look out. Our first real life night where we got people to go to ground the first 2 people went off to hospital as the dog took to them. On one of the Ed Frawley tapes there is a section where 20 odd police officers do the same senario with their dogs muzzled. Only 1 dog went for the right person. 19 went straight at the handler with the perp standing there.

In realism most dogs will bark and growl and a few will even take a nip at someone (most times from behind the person and down low but often like in the case you show on the hand or another part of the body away from the body of the person) and in most cases where the bad guy is scared of the dog this is enough but often this is not the case. Even in the case you speak of the guy got in his car and drove away. Clearly the injuries are very minor and the dog bite the hand which was enough for the guy to leave. Many people wil do that from a barking dog and most will from a small shallow ankle bite. But in many cases it simply is not enough. Not long ago someone here posted that their dog defended them by bitting the perps pant legs. No bite on the person but the dog got the leg of the gusy pants. The guy back off due to his fear of the dog not because of real defence. Also the guy was leaving already. Much ealer when the person is heading away then towards the dog.

Now for the experts who say that our rottweilers WILL NOT defend us in an attack, are there any actual real cases where a rottweiler DID NOT defend it's owner? Yep I persoanlly can give you over 100 but I will give you just a few. No locations/names etc will be given due to the personal nature of some of these incidents.

Guy (X) walking down a local bike track with his 3 year old male Rott. Male assalant jumps out from behind bushes and demands money. X refuses so assailant hits X over the head with tree branch. At the start of the incident dog barks but will not come out from beside X. X spends 4 days in Intensive care. Dog found 2 hours later by police officers over 1km from incident.

Young couple with 2 children home, 2 male assilants break in and hold them at knife point for 4 hours. 2 Rottweilers owned by the couple barked upon entry to the house. Male assailants soon quiet them by giving both a kick. Dogs later found at back extremeties of yard.

28 year old women out jogging with 5 year old Rottweiler. Starts to notice guy not dressed in Track suit etc is jogging behind her and getting closer. Dog also notices and is turning to look at man even gies a few small growls. YW starts heading for more populated area (she is in park land but broad day light). Assailant grabs young women from behind dog does get aggressive barking furiously but takes no bite. YW is raped and has several dog bites when found. Bites found to come from her own dog.

25 year old women home alone Sunday morning. Male assailant enters home and comes into bed room where dog and women are sleeping (dog on the bed). Upon the assailants entry dog leaps from bed at the person. Assailant backs dog off by swinging object at the dog (later found to be a knife). W raped multiple times. Dog urine later found in room.

Young women buys Rottweiler to protect her from astranged husband who is currently in prison. 2 years later upon his release he husband find women enters the house. Neighbours later remember the dog barking. Womens throat cut lucky to survive.

45 year old male purchases 3 year old Rottweiler male from local animal shelter to defend family after neighbourhood problems (next door neighbour threatened to kill them). He has 3 daughters. Daughter number one (16) takes dog for a walk to local park 4pm in the afternoon. At some time she is grabbed by neighbour beaten and raped. Dog hit by car running across the road away from the park area. Driven thankfully stops to give aid to dog. wonders where dog has come from but cannot see anyone. Dog dies but he later witnesses neighbour leaving park.

Man doing security work with 4 year old male Rott. (protecting car park stuff very light work). Male aproaches him and askes for time. As he looks down at his watch he is hit. Wakes up to find police over him. They later tell him he was bashed and kicked and that dog was hung over storm water pipe. Only survived as police put him down.

Rottweiler breeder in park with 4 of her dogs. Male approaches and tells her to keep her stinking, aggressive, good for nothing dogs away from her kids. Breeder quick to defend dogs says that she will but they are good dogs etc and he should mind his own business. This angers man who proceeds to hit breeder in the face. Dogs circle barking. One takes a small bite at back of males leg. He kicks at dog. Dog lets go and he leaves. Dogs very destressed and stay with breeder.

31 year old male walking 2 year old Rottweiler male. Small dogs runs up and bites the rott on the neck. Owner calls the Rott back to him scared he will kill the other dog. 2 females approach owner and accuse Rott of attacking their dog. Owner explains that it was the other way around and if they do not put the dog back on lead he will let Rott go. 2 females attack owner with tyre irons. Owner later found to have severe concusion, broken ribs and vertabrae, extensive bruising. Once again dog barked and run around the incident but did not bite.

And on a lighter note. After hearing similar stories one of my mates decides he is going to test his dog (4 year old male Rott) out. So one night he goes out and waits a few hours. He then sneaks into his house and climbs in a window near where the dog sleeps. He purposely makes a few noices. No barking. Upon entering room where dog sleeps finds dog hidding in laundry basket. When dog realises it is him he is much releaved.

These are real cases, all of which I have later either trained their existing dog or sold them trained dog. These are just a small taste of the huge number of similar cases. I could even give you an example of my brother and his home invasion were untrained dog didn't even bark.

In the end I doubt any of this will change your mind but maybe it will change someones. If you really believe that your dog will defend you go to a school where PP dogs are trained and ask them to test it. Chances are they will do it for free. In all my time of doing this for owners, 2 dogs have defended their owner and both later came up to be extremely impressive working dog. One of which I bought. In the vast majority of cases where a dog will naturally defend it's woner the dog posses a genetic make up where the dog shows non-classical aggression and would be considered far to aggressive for most owners. I can tell you about a Malinois who at only nine months defeded it's owner. But I will tell you also that later that dog bit the owner and in the end was too much for him to handle. The dog now lives with a professional full time dog trainer.

Belive what you won't but be prepared for it to go wrong. The courage required to take on an animal 2-3 times it's own size is a rare thing. In the modern era it is only apparent in about 5% of Rottweilers after training and maybe .02% naturally.
Reply With Quote


12 out of 12 members found this post helpful.
Members of Rottweiler Discussion Forums have rated post 1003250 as the most helpful. Skip right to it!
 
  #32  
Old 05-18-2011, 02:40 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Perth, Australia
Images: 8
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

Quote:
Further to this due to the fact that the dog is a pack animal also goes to why so many dogs in a real life threat actually attack the OWNER. A dog veiws the owner as the pack leader. Then this new person comes along and bashes the owner. The owner goes to ground. There is a new pack leader. This is something I see often and something I will illustrate in one of my actual cases I speak about. So just remember when you are relying on your dog to protect you if you are beaten and go to ground, look out. Even when we are talking about a trained Protectrion dog if it has not be trained to look for the owner and bite the other person look out. Our first real life night where we got people to go to ground the first 2 people went off to hospital as the dog took to them. On one of the Ed Frawley tapes there is a section where 20 odd police officers do the same senario with their dogs muzzled. Only 1 dog went for the right person. 19 went straight at the handler with the perp standing there.
Yes! If that doesn't make sense I don't know how else you would word it :)
Reply With Quote


1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
  #33  
Old 05-18-2011, 07:15 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Upstate, NY
Images: 21
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

Mick has such a tremendous wealth of knowlege. I erased my feble attempt and allow you his instead.
__________________
Lucy and 3 Rott'n Kids!
"If your dog thinks you're the greatest person in the world, don't seek a second opinion." Anonymous

Last edited by SABELLESMOM; 05-18-2011 at 07:25 AM.
Reply With Quote


  #34  
Old 05-18-2011, 07:46 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: canada
Images: 2
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

Thank you Mick, I found your post insightful. I want to make it clear that I do not want a guard dog,, just a loving pet,, which I have. I hope I will never have to find out whether she would defend me or not. I get so much from Daisy,, companionship, affection, love. And really that is all I want or need from her. I would protect her with everything I have and whether she would protect me or not would make no difference in my love and respect I have for her and the breed.



Respectful
Snowy
Reply With Quote


  #35  
Old 05-18-2011, 08:37 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

"If you think your puppy is courageous enough to protect you, the next time your friend wrestles with you, have your friend give your puppy a hard kick or take something and hit your puppy. "


Are you out of your mind? Snowy's pup is defensive over her mommy and you suggest her friend kick the dog to get a different reaction? Now I know why I've stopped posting on this forum, half of you people are nuts.

Snowy, I agree with you. I would like an alert reaction from my rott as well, which is in NO WAY a bad thing. I wouldn't expect my 10 year old son (if I had one) to defend me with his life, but he should still be alert for danger. Congrats on the wonderful pup :)
Reply With Quote


  #36  
Old 05-18-2011, 09:06 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: PA/USA
Images: 15
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash View Post
"If you think your puppy is courageous enough to protect you, the next time your friend wrestles with you, have your friend give your puppy a hard kick or take something and hit your puppy. "


Are you out of your mind? Snowy's pup is defensive over her mommy and you suggest her friend kick the dog to get a different reaction? Now I know why I've stopped posting on this forum, half of you people are nuts.

Snowy, I agree with you. I would like an alert reaction from my rott as well, which is in NO WAY a bad thing. I wouldn't expect my 10 year old son (if I had one) to defend me with his life, but he should still be alert for danger. Congrats on the wonderful pup :)

She didn't literally mean for her friend to hit or kick the dog! THINK!!! That's what she wanted you to do. Angelbunny has been involved in rescuing dogs for years. Do you really think she would literally want somone to hit or kick a dog? Did you read Mick's post? He is extremely experienced! probably more then anyone else on this formum.
__________________
Jennine
Sasha (rescue pup) 9/26/10
^Birdie^ (1/4/02-10/27/10)
Reply With Quote


  #37  
Old 05-18-2011, 09:51 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: mansfield, Ohio
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

I thought the same way you do, my rott was to friendly and is still friendly about 97% of the time. Certain people try to approach him he will growl
but I have never seen him scared of anything except thunder.
Reply With Quote


  #38  
Old 05-18-2011, 10:11 AM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Milton, FL, USA
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

He's a lover, not a fighter! I say get him out even more so people can see that Rottweilers may LOOK scary but they are not bad dogs! He sounds great!
Reply With Quote


  #39  
Old 05-18-2011, 11:05 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: New Hampshire
Images: 15
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash
"If you think your puppy is courageous enough to protect you, the next time your friend wrestles with you, have your friend give your puppy a hard kick or take something and hit your puppy. "

Are you out of your mind? Snowy's pup is defensive over her mommy and you suggest her friend kick the dog to get a different reaction? Now I know why I've stopped posting on this forum, half of you people are nuts....
I see you didn't read my comment:

Sure, it's a disturbing suggestion. My comment was meant to be, to get you thinking.
__________________
Rescue Rottweiler: NERR&R

UCDX North East’s Full of Moxie CDX, RE, CS, NEDDC NDD, BMDCA DD, NWPD, TT, CGC, TDI, HIC
December ? 1999 - November 7, 2011
Reply With Quote


  #40  
Old 05-18-2011, 12:13 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Boston, MA
Images: 46
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash View Post
"If you think your puppy is courageous enough to protect you, the next time your friend wrestles with you, have your friend give your puppy a hard kick or take something and hit your puppy. "


Are you out of your mind? Snowy's pup is defensive over her mommy and you suggest her friend kick the dog to get a different reaction? Now I know why I've stopped posting on this forum, half of you people are nuts.

Snowy, I agree with you. I would like an alert reaction from my rott as well, which is in NO WAY a bad thing. I wouldn't expect my 10 year old son (if I had one) to defend me with his life, but he should still be alert for danger. Congrats on the wonderful pup :)


First of all, she is not being literal here....it is an exercise on opening one's mind and at least attempting to learn.

Secondly, deterring and protection are vastly different and I am getting the impression the two are getting mixed up.

I had a Rottie who was goofy, sweet and friendly. My current dog, an APBT is too. In most cases a criminal will avoid a home or person with ANY dog because they sure don't want to make their job harder. The dog is a deterrent.

Lady H. barks when a stranger approaches alerting ME to suss out the situation. Cyrus the same. I protect them.
__________________
Denise

Cyrus CGC, adopted 3/27/04 -May 21, 2009. Forever in my heart.

Lady Harriett, Pitmix Princess

James, Alpha-Cat

Nichevo, Scratch and Babe, playing at the bridge, I miss you
Reply With Quote


  #41  
Old 05-18-2011, 02:04 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: canada
Images: 2
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

That's what I like about this site, weather I like the comments or not I always leave learning something. And thanks Crash, I am lucky to have her. I hope you will post again,, try not to let a few ruin it for you to get great advice from many..


Sincerely
Snowy
Reply With Quote


  #42  
Old 05-18-2011, 02:41 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Houston Texas/United States
Images: 37
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

Great post Mick, many here really value your input. There was a time when I thought my pup was protective. For the most part he portrays silly puppy over-exuberant friendly play. Occasionally he gets a wild hair and will attempt to lunge at someone, seeming to completely lock in.

The more I have learned to watch him, the more I begin to see that he reacts to my fears, tensing up when I pull him in tight on the lead, or when I talk in a hushed tense tone. It was a trainer that pointed this out. When I keep walking, loose lead, cheerful exchange with other person; Niko will give a quick glance and ignore other person.

Would he protect me if an individual advanced? With no training I don't see the reason to jeopardize either of us just to find out. The odds are stacked pretty high against us.

To the OP; when your pup gains size his presence will deter most people. In my neighborhood, people change directions quickly when we are out for a walk.
__________________
Cindy ~ "My goal in life... is to be the sort of person my dogs think I am."

Niko ~ aka the Neeks Meister 07/10/2009
Simone ~ aka Princess Monie 11/20/2010
Chance ~ aka Widget 12/21/2013
Reply With Quote


  #43  
Old 05-18-2011, 03:22 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

I think Mick's post is very informative and I appreciate the knowledge he has shared. I don't appreciate the attitude that is sometimes thrown around because of opinions or hopes or wants regarding our dogs.
Reply With Quote


  #44  
Old 05-18-2011, 03:50 PM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Plantsville, CT USA
Images: 14
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

I do not want my girl to protect me - it is my job to protect her! She is my family and just like my child I will defend her no matter what. I believe she is a deterrent just being a dog - big or small. She is really not going to protect me against a loaded gun - if someone is determined to do me harm they will figure out a way to do so no matter what.
That being said - she does let her presence be known by letting out a bark now and then when there is a knock at the door - with the butt wiggling too
Reply With Quote


1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
  #45  
Old 05-18-2011, 04:24 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Images: 33
Re: Is being too friendly bad?

My Rottie sits somewhere in the middle on nerves I think. I would not consider him weak-nerved, but on the same hand I would not consider him a strong-nerved dog either.

I, too, am on the road travelling for work constantly with my dog. I do have a great sense of ease having him with me than those few occasions I don't. That is not because I expect him to protect me from all the evil in the world, but because of his presence. He is of a size of dog (and breed of dog) that most ner do wells do not want to bother with. When I am in a hotel, apartment, wherever I am staying that week I am always seen out and about walking him, working with him so most people are aware that he is in there.

He is a dog that will let people he knows in to my house no questions asked. He is not is happy, go-lucky, love everyone self when I am not in the house and a known person walks in, but instead stands back and observes, never letting them out of his sight. Honestly, even those who know him and love him are intimidated by this change in demeanor and wait for me to get home . I did encounter a situation in a bush camp when an unknown person tried to enter my room while I was away while the dog was in there. I did not know the person would be entering to check the propane lines that day and I just happened to leave Justice behind. The propane fellow was greeted by a Rottie standing firmly in the door way, growling, huffing, baring his teeth and blocking his movements. Justice did not move toward the man, but instead prevented him from entering. Most would interpret this as 'protection'... I think it was more likely the dog was startled and uncomfortable with the man being there so was trying to tell him to leave him alone, not protect my place (although some amount of being territorial could be in play). Whatever the cause of the behaviour it was enough of a deterrent for the man not to enter . I still wonder (and have yet to find a willing guinea pig) if someone had spoken to him and used his name, possibly given a couple cookies if he would have changed his behaviour, I believe he would have.

I love the fact Justice is not a high-alert dog. If there is a change in the environment he will give a little huff to make me aware of the situation, or to make himself feel better. It is wonderful when I'm in a hotel that he is not 'alerting' on all the different noises of people, etc. in the hall. When I have my bulldog with me, he is not as confident with all the new noises and can be quite the PITA barking to 'alert me'. He is actually barking because of his insecurities, luckily when he is crated he is as quiet as a mouse. The most "protective" dog in my house, if we're basing it on barking at strangers and passers-by is the weak-nerved, fearful CKCS that stays with me for four months of the year. This dog alerts at every little noise, threat or not. If you want a dog that alerts you to every little change get a terrier, trust me, they'll bark.

As for out on walks the dogs that are viewed as "protecting" their owner by barking, growling, lunging are probably the least likely to do so... they are putting on a show because they are insecure and scared. Justice was/is like this with other dogs after having been attacked. Before we properly addressed and worked with the behaviour he would be barking, lunging, growling at the end of the leash when seeing another dog, all the while shaking in his boots. He was terrified of being attacked again, so he was putting on a good show to try and scare the other dog off before it even did anything. The dogs that walk by, not perceiving everything as a threat are probably more likely to be by your side during an attack (but I wouldn't count on it).
__________________
Tracey
***********************************
^Justice RN^, Rikku HIC & The Bulldogs:
'Maverick' NAC NJC TN-N PCD RA CRNMCL CRNT CGN TT HIC
CH 'Tali' NJC TN-N CGN HIC
Reply With Quote


1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Too Friendly! robyngaia Puppy Development 7 10-27-2010 10:06 PM
Dog Friendly Tatiana Puppy Development 3 05-08-2009 07:35 PM
Too friendly? mmalgosia Behavior 2 05-18-2008 07:41 AM
SERIOUSLY...Is She TOO Friendly?? kathyg General Info 26 07-30-2007 10:29 AM
Too Friendly?? TammyB General Info 32 01-27-1999 11:55 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:34 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.

The thoughts expressed in the interviews and/or commentary contained within these forums are solely those of the individual(s) providing them and do not represent and/or reflect the opinions of Rottweiler Dot Net, it's parent site or it's affiliates.

Copyright © 1998 - 2013 Rottweiler Discussion Forums-All Rights Reserved - No part of this site may be reproduced without permission.